A Wrong Hack at Albuquerque

Hacking
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest

What would happen if a military database holding information about ballistic missiles had insufficient security? We’ll find out soon.

A group of hackers have gained access to a US military system known as Westech International, based in Albuquerque. They’ve stolen a series of classified data and encrypted hard drives to leak said data. The affected company is a sub-contractor for Northrup Gruman, the company that provides maintenance and engineering support for the Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles. The data was taken and leaked online. Information among this featured company emails, payroll information and more “personal information”.

To make things even worse, “we recently experienced a ransomware incident, which affected some of our systems and encrypted some of our files. Upon learning of the issue, we immediately commenced an investigation and contained our systems. We have also been working closely with an independent computer forensic firm to analyse our systems for any compromise and to determine if any personal information is at risk,” Westech told Sky News. Their systems were encrypted using Maze ransomware, available on crime marketplaces, on the dark web. Cybercrime is no longer a dedicated term for the spotty teenagers that hope to strike it rich with an untargeted attack.

“Organised cybercriminals are big-game hunting, and they are gunning for companies to take down. Companies are reaching a turning point where they understand that it’s inevitable, they will succumb to a cyberattack. It’s one reason why the principle of zero trust is gaining ground: You can’t trust users because any user could be compromised at any time,” said Matt Lock, the tech director of Varonis, a cybersecurity company.

The US Department of Defence has yet to make a comment on the incident.

So, if the world is going to burn in nuclear fire, just remember to prepare yourself using the best Fallout game there is, New Vegas.

If you have any questions about this article, please contact the Samurai team here.

The latest cyber security news

Enter your email below to be notified when a new article is released.

Share this post with your colleagues

Share on linkedin
Share on facebook
Share on twitter

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.